COVID-19 update included
The content of this report will be updated with the latest scenarios based on the global COVID-19 Pandemic


Summary

Virtual reality (VR) has been around, in one form or another, since the mid-1950s. At several points over the last sixty-plus years, it has been touted as the next big thing in consumer technology, without ever fulfilling its potential. Facebook’s $2bn acquisition of Oculus in 2014 prompted another wave of interest, with adherents, eager to forget VR’s chequered past, dubbing the new generation of devices that followed in the wake of this deal VR 1.0.

Devices from Oculus, Sony, Samsung, Google, and HTC (among others) gained a foothold in the market, but VR 1.0 remained a niche concern, popular primarily with affluent early adopters and hampered, like previous iterations of VR, by technical drawbacks and unrealistic expectations. Consequently, the industry finds itself in transition once again, moving between VR 1.0 and a second generation, which holds the potential for more mainstream adoption.

VR technology can help the power industry to deliver workforce training and education in an immersive environment. VR headsets position the employee in a computer-simulated environment that imitates real-world conditions. Employees can now be trained effectively and efficiently on how to manage and respond to such situations.

Major utilities and power companies such as Duke Energy, Consolidated Edison, PG&E, National Grid Plc, Electricite de France SA (EDF), PPL Electric Utilities Corporation, General Electric Co (GE), Siemens, and Fortum are deploying VR technology into the industry’s workforce.


Scope

  • This report explores virtual reality (VR) and its use cases across five segments - semiconductors, components, headsets, platforms, and applications and content.
  • It identifies the winners and losers dominating the current technology theme, across these five segments.
  • It identifies VR case studies in the power industry.




Reasons To Buy

  • The report identifies market leaders and challengers in virtual reality sector, across five segments - semiconductors, components, headsets, platforms, and applications and content.
  • It provides a technology briefing of VR and discusses its most critical aspects.
  • It identifies the main trends in the VR theme over the next two to three years.
  • It provides an overview of the VR value chain categorized across five segments - semiconductors, components, headsets, platforms, and applications and content.
  • The report analyses the technology theme, with use cases, market size and growth forecasts, competitive analysis, VR in the power sector, mergers and acquisitions, and a timeline.
  • The report looks at power sector companies who are making their mark within the VR theme.